British Expeditionary Force. The Passchedaele Campaign 1917

An in-depth account of the campaign that has come to symbolize the horrors of the Western Front. Excellent account supported by first rate maps through the body of the book and an evocative photo-plate section – Highly Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: British Expeditionary Force. The Passchedaele Campaign 1917
FILE: R2575
AUTHOR: Andrew Rawson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  239
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, World War 1, First World War, The Great 
War, Germany, BEF, Western Front, trench warfare, war of attrition

ISBN: 1-52670-400-5

IMAGE: B2575.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ydc9e4du
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: An in-depth account of the campaign that has come to 
symbolize the horrors of the Western Front.  Excellent account 
supported by first rate maps through the body of the book and an 
evocative photo-plate section – Highly Recommended.

As we come toward the centenary of the end of WWI, there are still 
books appearing that challenge and provide fresh insight, new detail, 
new conclusions. The last soldier of the war is dead, the conditions 
of the trenches are no longer a distant memory, but a distant 
impression. There is still much to be seen from walking the 
battlefields, but the hideous scar of mud that ran from the Chanel to 
Switzerland is gone, leaving only the scattered and muted remanents of 
the War To End All Wars that was really a war to launch more wars. 
The remains of soldiers are still being recovered, many are 
identified by modern forensics and all are being reburied with 
military honours.

The author has carefully researched his subject and presented 
compelling text. He offers a comprehensive view, fresh insight, new 
detail, all supported by maps that help to explain this huge and 
terribly costly campaign, with a photo plate section that is 
evocative and conveys at least an impression of the terrors and 
exhaustion. The photographs of 18lb QF guns with the men and horses 
of their teams illustrate the mud and mess and contrast with the 
Snaffles painting hanging in the Arborfield College Mess. Usually a 
very accurate war artist, Snaffles portrays a level of movement as 
his gun team flies through the mud to avoid counter-battery fire. 
He prided himself on accuracy so this must have been drawn from life 
but was a rare level of movement. Normally, field guns were moved 
by manpower and horsepower, hauling a dead weight through mud that 
came up to the axels and worse.