Bomber Command Airfields of Yorkshire

A comprehensive review of Bomber Command’s airfields in Yorkshire, reviewed alphabetically. The author has assembled a collection of reviews of airfields in one geographic area of Britain during WWII that were primarily, or exclusively. used as bomber bases – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Bomber Command Airfields of Yorkshire
FILE: R2582
AUTHOR: Peter Jacobs
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  222
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, 
obsolescent warplanes, medium bombers, heavy bombers, Yorkshire, 
concrete aircraft carrier, Bomber Command, RAF

ISBN: 1-78346-331-2

IMAGE: B2582.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ycm2yoa8
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A comprehensive review of Bomber Command's airfields 
in Yorkshire, reviewed alphabetically.  The author has assembled a 
collection of reviews of airfields in one geographic area of Britain 
during WWII that were primarily, or exclusively. used as bomber 
bases – Highly Recommended.

WWII saw the British Isles turned into a giant concrete aircraft 
carrier off the coast of German Occupied Europe. Inevitably the East 
Coast saw the greatest concentration of airfields because it was 
closest tot he targets. Not all bases were newly built. Some dated 
from WWI and a handful had seen some use before 1914. However, the 
majority were built from 1940 and in most cases featured hard runways. 
To speed work and save materials, there was some use of part runways 
so that heavy fully laden bombers could taxi out from their hangers to 
a short length of runway that was expected to be long enough for them to 
rotate at V2 and become airborne before reaching the end of the 
concrete. The runway then continued to the boundary as a cut grass 
strip, ensuring a more than adequate clear path as the heavy aircraft 
struggled to gain height. It also provided for those that failed to 
reach flying speed, or landed with damaged brakes and control surfaces.

One challenge that became ever more taxing was in fitting in new 
airfields in an already overcrowded landscape. The RAF had to allow 
for bomber and fighter bases for its own aircraft and facilities for 
Fleet Air Arm squadrons ashore. To that was added the need for USAAF 
bases. The result was that much of Eastern England saw airfields 
every seven miles. It is surprising that this did not result in more 
landing accidents. Long after WWII, Norwich Airport and RAF 
Coltishall were about seven miles apart, both with concrete runways 
on the same headings. Air traffic control at Norwich were surprised 
when two Lightning fighters landed, mistaking the Norwich St Faiths 
airfield for Coltishall. It is easy to imagine the challenges during 
WWII when the air was thick with aircraft returning from raids or 
setting off on raids, those returning often facing the added 
challenge of battle damage.

The author has researched his subject well and provided a very 
interesting collection of images, reproduced through the body of 
the book. In particular the images include aircraft like the Whitley 
and Halifax that are not commonly used in illustration, being 
considered by many historians as less glamorous than the Lancasters 
and Mosquitoes.