Bomb Disposal in World War Two

The publisher has established a reputation for correcting the neglect of important military history and this book is another fine example. The unsung story of WWII was the battle between bomb disposal units and German armourers. It required a special type of courage and a special type of man – Much Recommended.


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NAME: Bomb Disposal in World War Two
FILE: R2670
AUTHOR: Chris Ransted
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  282
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, bombs, 
fuzes, time delays, booby traps, bomb disposal, UXB, ARP, Naval 
Clearance Divers, armourers, secret war

ISBN: 52671-565-1

IMAGE: B2670.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y97vbru4
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The publisher has established a reputation for 
correcting the neglect of important military history and this book 
is another fine example. The unsung story of WWII was the battle 
between bomb disposal units and German armourers. It required a 
special type of courage and a special type of man – Much Recommended.

Most will assume that the objective of building any type of 
delivered or locomotive explosive device is to produce a bomb that 
can be dropped from aircraft to explode on impact, destroying an 
enemy military target. It is however much more complex.

A bomb, mine, or torpedo, has to be carried safely by the delivery 
vehicle, but become active at the time of release and to trigger in 
the presence of a suitable target. That requires a fuse that can be 
fitted to the device by an armourer, with a safety device. That 
safety then has to be removed to make the weapon live and deadly. 
There are a number of ways in which this can be done. A common 
safety is a pin that only has to be removed to make the weapon live 
before throwing, dropping or launching it. To increase safety for 
the delivery crew, the fuse can be rendered partially effective by 
removing a safety pin, and then move to fully live by an additional 
factor. Sea mines can employ a soluble plug that is the final safety. 
Once the mine is immersed in water, the plug dissolves and the mine 
becomes fully live, to be initiated by a further action, such as a 
contact or a time fuse. Torpedoes frequently employ a simple 
propeller that rotates after launch until the fuse is fully live. 
In WWII, bombs dropped from aircraft often required a crew member to 
remove safety pins after take-off and for the fuse to become fully 
live as airflow rotated a small propeller once the bomb had left 
the aircraft.

The result of fusing techniques is that bombs, mines and torpedoes 
can arrive a the target without having become fully armed. That is 
a simple manufacturing or human error. However, the device can still 
be deadly as the defect fixes itself or the weapon is moved without 
great care. When hundreds of bombers attack every night, there are 
inevitably bombs that fail to detonate. Until a bomb disposal crew 
has rendered the weapon safe and removed it, the inactive weapon can 
cause as much disruption as if it had exploded on impact.

To deal with the defects of German bombing, bomb disposal engineers 
had to be trained equipped and deployed. During the London Blitz they 
were kept very busy, just dealing with bombs that had failed. That 
was an exhausting and dangerous job which became even more demanding 
as the German armourers tried to develop fuses that would kill 
rescuers and bomb disposal engineers.

This is a fascinating and thrilling story and it is amazing that it 
has been so neglected by the media during the war and historians since 
then. The bomb disposal engineers required a very special courage and 
were very special people who might have to work on more than ten 
bombs a day, seven days a week, each bomb being capable of killing 
them if they made the smallest mistake or faced a new type of fuse for 
the first time. The RN, the Army and the RAF all had to train bomb 
disposal engineers. Their work played a very important part in the 
defeat of Nazi Germany.

This thrilling story is told very well and supported by many rare 
images. A must read book.