Blood and Soil, The Memoir of a Third Reich Brandenburger

A rare glimpse of the Brandenburger special forces in WWII. The Brandenburgers were perhaps the first modern special forces to be formed and their history is little known, making this personal memoir of a Brandenburger an important addition to the historical knowledge of WWII – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Blood and Soil, The Memoir of a Third Reich Brandenburger
FILE: R2957
AUTHOR: Sepp De Giampietro
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, Greenhill Books
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Tyrol, 
Brandenburger, special forces, covert operations, German Army, Balkans, Eastern 
Front

ISBN: 978-1-78438-341-1

IMAGE: B2957.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yyp6r45l
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: A rare glimpse of the Brandenburger special forces in WWII. The 
Brandenburgers were perhaps the first modern special forces to be formed and 
their history is little known, making this personal memoir of a Brandenburger 
an important addition to the historical knowledge of WWII –   Very Highly Recommended.

The author originally wrote this personal experience as a Brandenburger in the 
German language for publication in 1984. This edition has been expertly translated 
into English by Eva Burke. It is a unique story of a unit that was an important special 
operations unit of the Wehrmacht but is almost totally unknown. Special forces sit in 
the space between regular troops and the intelligence services of their country so that 
much of what they are tasked with is classified and therefore leaks into the public 
domain slowly was unit members write memoirs and official material is declassified. 
In the case of the Brandenburgers, much of their written material was lost in the 
intensive bombing of Germany and the chaos of defeat, but of greater importance is 
most probably a result of their very high casualty rates. In 1941, the author was 
involved in the attempted capture of the bridge at Bataisk, when half his unit was lost. 
That loss rate was by no mains unusual for the Brandenburgers and as the war 
progressed, many of the duties they would have undertaken were adopted by the SS.

This very personal history of the Brandenburgers is told within the very particular 
context of South Tyrol from where the author originates. This is a fluently told story 
with a very interesting collection of illustrations, making a vivid record that provides 
a unique insight into the structure, activities, training and comradeship of a unit that 
has almost completely evaded the attentions of historians.

There are many aspects of the story that are similar to the SS. The tasks included 
overt operations and espionage and involved many operations that were dangerous to 
foolhardy. The Brandenburgers attacked their objectives with the same fanatical zeal 
that the SS often displayed which explains why casualty rates were so high.