Beachhead Assault, The Story of the Royal Naval Commandos In World War Two

Correcting the neglect of this very important organization, the author provides an inspiring account of the Royal Naval Commandos through an outstanding collection of anecdotes. The text is moving, inspiring, vivid, and the illustration in maps and images impressive – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Beachhead Assault, The Story of the Royal Naval Commandos In 
World War Two
FILE: R2494
AUTHOR: David Lee
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Frontline
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  272
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Second World War, WWII, World War Two, World War 2, 
reconnaissance, defence, coast defence, underground army, intelligence, 
Resistance, beach assault, beach masters, beach markers

ISBN: 1-47389-429-7

IMAGE: B2494.jpg6
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/konutt4
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Correcting the neglect of this very important 
organization, the author provides an inspiring account of the Royal 
Naval Commandos through an outstanding collection of anecdotes. The 
text is moving, inspiring, vivid, and the illustration in maps and 
images impressive - Highly Recommended.

World War Two saw the introduction of a new family of special forces 
by the British. The number of organizations can be confusing. The 
Army and the Royal Marines formed Commando units. Special private 
armies were formed by some very colourful individuals, including the 
SAS and the Long Range Desert Group. The actions they participated in 
are stirring and impressive. They took the war to the Germans when no 
other organization could. They were a gift to the propaganda service 
in providing news that broke the tired and familiar diet of retreats 
and defeats. The Commando unit that received less coverage at the time 
and since was the Royal Naval Commandos and this was partly due to the 
critical role they played in preparing for amphibious landings, 
culminating in D-Day. Their work was no less heroic but it was very 
sensitive. Without them a series of invasions would have struggled to 
succeed.

There has been some debate as to where the term 'Commando' came from. 
The high probability is that it originated from Churchill himself. As 
a young man, he was present in South Africa where the Boers had set up 
fast moving light cavalry that specialized in hit and run attacks on 
British troops. They were described as Kommando units because they were 
self-supporting mobile commands that were frequently engaged in 
opportunist raiding. Churchill had ordered the formation of special 
forces to take the fight to the Germans at a time when the Army was 
reforming and re-equipping after its withdrawal from France. The Boer 
Kommando were a good role model for what would be an escalating campaign 
of attacks on targets in Occupied Europe, the Mediterranean and North 
Africa.

The Royal Naval Commando differed from its sister organizations in that 
it had a specific role in support of beach assault. Other Commando units 
were tasked with hitting specific targets behind enemy lines. Typically, 
in Europe, the Commando force could range from a handful of highly 
trained troops to a large force of perhaps battalion strength. They would 
often be parachuted into Occupied Europe behind the target, carry out 
their attack, or seize enemy technology, such as radar equipment, and 
then escape to the coast to be picked up by coastal forces motor boats or 
by submarines. In the Mediterranean, they often arrived by boat and left 
the same way. In North Africa, they drove through the desert far to the 
flank of the enemy, and then drove hard for their own lines, frequently 
having to go far South to avoid enemy troops. All of these attacks 
required extensive training, considerable courage and determination, and 
a fair measure of luck. What they shared in common were attacks that were 
most frequently self-contained campaigns or raids where they were 
dependent on their own resources until they could be extracted.

Beach assault was a different activity because it involved reconnaissance 
and path finding for large forces being landed on heavily defended coasts. 
Their job involved going in at the early stages of planning and 
identifying the types of defence installed by the enemy, sampling the 
coast line to determine how well heavy vehicles could cope during the 
very vulnerable landings. Then they might have to return many times to 
check and recheck as the plans were put in place and the men and materials 
assembled for the assault. Finally, they would go back just ahead of the 
invasion fleet, marking the path for the landings.

The author has carefully researched and collected anecdotes that combine 
to provide a vivid picture of this critical organization that laid the 
foundations for successful beach assaults and then participated in the 
hottest stages of the actions.