Battleground Dunkirk, The Battle of the Ypres-Comines Canal 1940, France and Flanders Campaign

A worthy addition to a brilliant series of battleground guides which is becoming a highly successful series of guides. The defeat of the Allies in the Battle of France and the amazing and courageous success of evacuating over 300,000 British and French troops from the exposed beaches of Dunkirk may explain why the battles that made the Dunkirk evacuation possible have long deserved better coverage. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Battleground Dunkirk, The Battle of the Ypres-Comines Canal 1940, France 
and Flanders Campaign
FILE: R3142
AUTHOR: Jerry Murland
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £12.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:  WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 
Battle of France, Flanders, Dunkirk, Ypres-Comines Canal, 1940, BEF, rear guard, 
Dunkirk evacuation

ISBN: 1-47385-257-9
PAGES: 154
IMAGE: B3142.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/thmao7y
DESCRIPTION: A worthy addition to a brilliant series of battleground guides which 
is becoming a highly successful series of guides. The defeat of the Allies in the 
Battle of France and the amazing and courageous success of evacuating over 
300,000 British and French troops from the exposed beaches of Dunkirk may 
explain why the battles that made the Dunkirk evacuation possible have long 
deserved better coverage. – Most Highly Recommended.

The critical battles, that provided the rear guard to allow British and French troops to 
escape through Dunkirk, of WWII were fought over the same ground that has become 
famous as the places where courage flowered in the terrible conditions of WWI. The 
author began his experience of the battlegrounds in following the footsteps of his 
grandfather during WWI. As his unique knowledge and experience developed he 
began to look at what happened over the same ground in WWII, following the pattern 
of conflict through the Low Countries and North Western France for centuries.

Many myths have developed around the early battles of WWII. The widespread view 
is that, after a period of Phony War when Hitler thought Britain and France would 
think again and begin peace negotiations, the German Army and Luftwaffe swept 
through France to victory with the greatest of speed and convincingly defeated the 
Allies. At that point Hitler was convinced that Britain would follow France in 
surrender without firing any more shots. The reality was that the Battle of Britain 
began as the BEF and French units fell back on Dunkirk. Had the Germans managed 
to capture all of the French and British soldiers, the outcome of WWII might have 
been different. The act of evacuating very large numbers of troops from under the 
noses of the Germans was a victory in that the Royal Navy and its civilian volunteers 
succeeded dramatically in achieving all the objectives of their Battle of Dunkirk, one 
of the few battles through history where the soldiers that left the field of battle 
actually won.

At Arras, the British tanks demonstrated their technical superiority over the Germans 
and showed what could have been achieved had there been adequate air support and 
tanks deployed in force with supporting infantry and artillery from the beginning of 
the German invasion of Belgium and France. The Germans certainly did appreciate 
that and Arras sent shivers running through them. The Wehrmacht was deeply shaken 
by Arras. At the Ypres-Comines Canal and all of the steps back towards the Dunkirk 
perimeter, the British rear guard fought with courage and distinction. Those who 
escaped from Dunkirk owed their freedom to the rear guard and Britain owed the 
eventual victory in Europe to these brave men, many of whom were raw volunteers 
and reserves. There had not been a similarly inspiring retreat and evacuation since the 
Napoleonic Wars when Generalleutnant Graf von Hohenlau broke through the French 
encirclement and fought his way to the Baltic coast where the Royal Navy, Britain 
was not an ally of Prussia at the time, helped evacuate the Prussian troops from the 
beaches.
  
The author has provided a well illustrated guide that is pocketable and will serve
those who visit the battleground on their own. It will equally make a visit more 
productive for those joining a guided party and help military history enthusiasts who 
may not visit the battleground to gain a better understanding of the whole campaign 
in France.