At Close Quarters, An Illustrated History of the US Navy in the Vietnam War

The US involvement in Indo-China is often viewed as a disaster and the main focus has been on the US Army and US Marines ashore. This book provides a comprehensive review of the significant US Navy involvement, supported by a fantastic selection of excellent images – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: At Close Quarters, An Illustrated History of the US Navy in 
the Vietnam War
FILE: R2686
AUTHOR: editor Edward J Marolda
PUBLISHER: Naval Institute Press
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  346
PRICE: $39.95
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Indo-China, Vietnam, South Vietnam, North Vietnam, China, 
Russia, Col War, Domino Theory, US Navy, US Marine Corps, ground 
strike aircraft, carrier aircraft, naval aviation, helicopters, 
gunships, riverine warfare, strategic bombing, tactical bombing, Top 
Gun, dog fights

ISBN: 978-1-68247-195-1

IMAGE: B2686.jpg
BUYNOW: www.usni.org/store/books/spring-2018-catalog/combat-close-quarters
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The US involvement in Indo-China is often viewed as a 
disaster and the main focus has been on the US Army and US Marines 
ashore. This book provides a comprehensive review of the significant 
US Navy involvement, supported by a fantastic selection of excellent 
images – Most Highly Recommended.

The US involvement in the Vietnam War was controversial and remains 
so today. The US lost, being forced to retreat, but the battles were 
fought as much in the US by draft dodgers and demonstrators, as by 
the North Vietnamese. No military can win a war without the support 
of its citizens. The protest movement became the Vietnamese fifth 
column and proved devastatingly effective against its own soldiers, 
sailors and airmen. However, US military personnel fought with skill 
and courage, accepted heavy casualties even though some command 
decisions and culture may have been less than they deserved.

For the US Navy, Vietnam involved them at every level. US Marines 
served ashore in large numbers. Riverine craft were operated on the 
Vietnamese waterways, and naval aircraft of every type were operated 
from land bases and from carriers offshore, supported by Royal 
Australian Navy warships and carrier aircraft.

The editor has provided a balanced and comprehensive view of US 
Navy activities with the support of lavish illustration in the form 
of stunning photographs, highly detailed maps and paintings. The 
war was in three parts for the US Navy, each part was essential in 
support of the other parts. 

Ashore and on the river network large numbers of USMarines were 
deployed, together with a large riverine force that was equipped 
with fast patrol boats and specialist gunboats, with supporting 
'mother' facilities afloat on pontoons and adapted ships.

At sea, the US Navy maintained a large carrier force that was 
employed both on tactical bombing duties in South Vietnam in 
support of land forces and strategically over North Vietnam. This 
required a large task force structure of carriers with supporting 
warships and supply train. It also exposed a weakness in equipment 
and training due to the preoccupation of the Cod War in conflict 
with Soviet forces. This had resulted in aircraft being seen as 
missile carriers without guns and, consequently, a failure to train 
fighter pilots in dogfighting with smaller enemy aircraft, leading 
to the creation of the Top Gun school to retrain fighter pilots.

The first two parts have received coverage at the time on television 
and in the press, and subsequently by historians and political 
analysts, but the third part has received almost no coverage. The 
third area was served by Naval Intelligence. In addition to the 
obvious photographic reconnaissance flights using carrier aircraft 
and some land-based patrol aircraft, 'spy' ships were used, with 
electronic warfare aircraft. This area has received good coverage 
in this book.

The controversial nature of the Vietnam War, its place as the first 
real televised war, and the part played by protestors in undermining 
their own troops, has produced a vast amount of fog and confusion. 
This book provides a picture of how it was from a US Navy perspective 
which makes it a very important study that should appeal way beyond 
naval history enthusiasts, professionals and military buffs.