Astronomy Manual, The Practical Guide To The Night Sky

B1612

……..an outstanding book that will appeal to aspirant astronomers through to highly experienced practitioners. As Sir Patrick Moore, in a highly appreciative Introduction, says he has learned something from the manual after a lifetime of devotion to the subject. To receive a commendation from a father of modern astronomy is hard to beat. The publishers have done a first rate job in producing a lavishly illustrated book that uses full colour throughout. It is one of those books where a review can rapidly run out of superlatives. Haynes developed their publishing reputation in producing manuals and that experience shows. The result is a book that a very wide readership will eagerly acquire. Very highly recommended

Aerospace & Defence

Nighthawk

Firetrench Directory

NAME: Astronomy Manual, The Practical Guide To The Night Sky
CLASSIFICATION: Book reviews
FILE: R1612
Date: 191010
AUTHOR: Jane A Green
PUBLISHER: Haynes
BINDING: Hard back
PAGES: 201
PRICE: GB £19.99
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT: star gazing, the night sky, naked eye, telescopes, binoculars, cameras, webcam, moon map, astronomy, mathematics
ISBN: 978-1-84425-821-5
IMAGE: B1612
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/
DESCRIPTION: At a time of climate fraudsters, eco luddites and economic constraints, it can be hard to remember that the natural order is to expand and colonize, with space as the new frontier. When man eventually achieves a sustained space exploration programme and manned space flight goes out across our solar system and beyond, it will owe an incalculable debt to generations of astronomers. From time immemorial humans have gazed up into the night sky with awe. Their increasingly accurate study of the sky led to the development of farming techniques that were built on an ability to predict the seasons and develop a calendar that could be relied on. Without that we would still be hunter gathers at risk to the vagaries of climate and without the means to continue to develop technology. This new book very ably provides a manual for aspirant astronomers. Aside from the ancient urges to learn more about our surroundings, astronomy is one of the few scientific activities that virtually anyone can engage it. Nothing more than the naked eye and a basic book on astronomy is required to take up this absorbing activity. Beyond that starting point, which this book will greatly assist, the apprentice astronomer can develop as time and funds permit. A good pair of binoculars will provide a major step forward and an adequate pair will not require a great investment. Specialist binoculars can require deep pockets but the entry level telescopes will cost less and may prove easier to use. The only caution is that this is an activity that can become addictive. It can be approached incrementally. The first pair of binoculars will continue to give good service even when a great deal of equipment has been amassed. As the astronomer develops skills and needs, some early equipment can be traded in or components used with more advanced equipment. A digital SLR camera or a webcam can be used for many purposes and shared within a family or a group of friends. However, powerful telescopes and computer systems will start to require more serious funding. At some point back yard astronomy will give way to the travelling astronomer or even the pursuit of an academic career to take advantage of some very costly equipment and observatories built where air pollution is a lower problem or located beyond Earth’s atmosphere. The author is very well equipped to produce an astronomy manual. She is a skilled amateur. She has developed from first steps to the point where she is highly regarded amongst astronomers and has given lectures around the world. She has written an outstanding book that will appeal to aspirant astronomers through to highly experienced practitioners. As Sir Patrick Moore in a highly appreciative Introduction says he has learned something from the manual after a lifetime of devotion to the subject. To receive a commendation from a father of modern astronomy is hard to beat. The publishers have done a first rate job in producing a lavishly illustrated book that uses full colour throughout. It is one of those books where a review can rapidly run out of superlatives. Haynes developed their publishing reputation in producing manuals and that experience shows. The result is a book that a very wide readership will eagerly acquire. Very highly recommended

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