Assassins, The KGB’s Poison Factory 10 Years On

The author, a former GRU officer and now an historian, updates the assassins story during the last decade. The use of computer hacking, disinformation, propaganda and murder by Putin’s Russia pose every bit as much threat to his neighbours as did the Soviet Union. – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Assassins, The KGB's Poison Factory 10 Years On
FILE: R3153
AUTHOR: Boris Volodarsky
PUBLISHER: frontline books, Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:  Intelligence services, GRU, KGB, FSB, assassination, murder squads, 
poison, radiation, post-Cold War, international relations, collateral damage, civilian 
casualties, unintended consequences

ISBN: 1-52673-392-7

PAGES: 322
IMAGE: B3153.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ry6tvrl
DESCRIPTION: The author, a former GRU officer and now an historian, updates the 
assassins story during the last decade. The use of computer hacking, disinformation, 
propaganda and murder by Putin's Russia pose every bit as much threat to his 
neighbours as did the Soviet Union. - Most Highly Recommended

The Russia intelligence services have included assassination units, before the Soviet 
era and after it. Although a variety of weapons have been used, poison has always 
featured. It may be a very long time before that changes because terror has been an
important factor through Russia's history. Czar Ivan, 'the Terrible' sent out his 
Oprichniki to terrorise peasant and boyer alike in ways familiar to more recent 
Russian organs. The Oprichniki favoured frying their more important victims to death 
in giant frying pans and the tradition continued in the Soviet era when the GRU 
favoured killing their victims by cremating them alive. Shooting and hanging was 
common and all of these terrors were intended to enable a small number of people to 
ruthlessly rule a very large number. Poison was a favoured weapon abroad but the ice 
pick and gun were also used on Bolsheviks who had fled the Soviet Union.

Today, the FSB and GRU are happy to track down and murder people disliked by
Putin without any regard to collateral damage amongst citizens in the country where 
the victims were run down. As radioactive poisons are now most favoured, the 
probability of collateral damage on a major scale is very high, increased by apparent 
incompetence of the assassins. This incompetence against earlier assassinations 
brings to mind a joke circulating in post-Soviet Russia – a man queuing for bread 
made a rude remark about the current leadership & a KGB officer in the queue 
berated him for the remark pointing out that under the Soviet regime he would 
have been taken and shot. When the man returned home he told his wife what had 
happened and observed, “ I knew things were bad but even the KGB cant afford to 
buy bullets any more”.

The author has provided a detailed review of the state of play and it makes 
enthralling, if chilling, reading. The assassinations will only stop if countries where
 they take place act quickly and seriously against Putin and the mafia currently ruling 
Russia.