Armoured Cruiser Cressy, detailed in the original builders’ plans

An addition to a unique series in co-operation with the (British) National Maritime Museum. This book provides a unique insight into an important class of Royal Navy warship by providing original source material with high quality photographic copies of the original builders’ plans. Most Highly Recommended

NAME:  Armoured Cruiser Cressy, detailed in the original builders' plans
FILE: R3295
AUTHOR: Andrew Choong
PUBLISHER: Seaforth Publishing, Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £30.00                                                  
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Royal Navy, armoured ships, cruisers, line of battle, big gun armament, 
steam powered, fleet cruisers, battle fleet, builders' plans, technical drawings

ISBN: 978-1-5267-6637-3

PAGES: 128, a wealth of photographic images, many in full colour, through the body 
of the book
IMAGE: B3295.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4d5lk6v
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DESCRIPTION: An  addition to a unique series in co-operation with the (British) 
National Maritime Museum. This book provides a unique insight into an important 
class of Royal Navy warship by providing original source material with high 
quality photographic copies of the original builders' plans.  Most Highly
Recommended

The cruiser is a powerful warship that has evolved from the heavy frigate where a heavy armament was installed in a fast and nimble vessel that could out sail a majestic line-of-battle ship. It was a versatile class that could be employed alone as a commerce raider, or used to provide a heavy armament to augment the traditional convoy escorts. It could also be employed in a role that was later filled by Destroyer Leaders from WWI onwards, being slightly stretched destroyers with a heavier armament as the lead vessel in a squadron of destroyers and smaller vessels.

The armoured cruiser was a further evolution of the Napoleonic War cruiser or heavy frigate. It took advantage of the advances in steam power and steel hull construction. As this book shows, the armoured cruiser of the late Victorian Royal Navy was very heavily armed, able to absorb damage, but still a fast vessel. The battleship of the time was also armoured, carried a mixed gun armament, with guns little larger or more numerous than the armoured cruisers, but generally slower.

When battleships carried main guns of 9-11inches, armoured cruisers like HMS Cressy carried at least one gun of 9 inches, usually mounted in turret or barbette aft of the main superstructure. The 6in guns were mounted forward and a variety of smaller guns were also mounted. It was common to add to the firepower with internal torpedo tubes mounted low in the hull. With anything up to six boilers, Cressy was equipped with four, high speeds could be achieved over an extended period, giving it the speed to run down any warship of equal or lesser gun power, and run out of gun range against any warship with heavier armament.

Although the great strength of this book is in the unique set of very rare drawings, there is also very supportive text in the form of introductions to sections, extended captions and captions. Serious enthusiasts, historians and professionals will be well served by this book, but it is offered at a very aggressive pricing for a book of this quality and will be within the price range of a wider readership.