Antigonus the One-Eyed, Greatest of the Successors

B2065

The publisher is building a fine catalogue of titles covering aspects of the Ancient World, and particularly of the lesser known leaders and conflicts. This new book forms part of that catalogue and tells the exciting story of one of those competing to succeed Alexander the Great. The sudden death of a young Alexander left a huge vacuum and the years following saw a number of individuals seek to succeed him. Enthusiasts will have already come across these competitors, but probably only in rough outline. This book provides a comprehensive review of one of the Successors. Perhaps one of the least likely, Antigonus has come to be regarded as the Greatest of the Successors. ‘Greatest’ is always a subjective description but the story of Antigonus is absorbing and motivating.

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NAME: Antigonus the One-Eyed, Greatest of the Successors
DATE: 141114
FILE: R2065
AUTHOR: Jeff Champion
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 235
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Alexander the Great, Philip, the Successors, Maedonia, Europe, Egypt, Ptolemy, Seleukos, Cassander, Lycimachus, Ancient Greece, Mediterranean
ISBN: 1-78303-042-9
IMAGE: B2065.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/q6q4nb6
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The publisher is building a fine catalogue of titles covering aspects of the Ancient World, and particularly of the lesser known leaders and conflicts. This new book forms part of that catalogue and tells the exciting story of one of those competing to succeed Alexander the Great. The sudden death of a young Alexander left a huge vacuum and the years following saw a number of individuals seek to succeed him. Enthusiasts will have already come across these competitors, but probably only in rough outline. This book provides a comprehensive review of one of the Successors. Perhaps one of the least likely, Antigonus has come to be regarded as the Greatest of the Successors. ‘Greatest’ is always a subjective description but the story of Antigonus is absorbing and motivating.

Governor of an obscure province, Phrygia, Antigonus was hardly the most likely competitor for the crown of Alexander. In reality, he combined military prowess with political acumen, often a very rare combination. Using these attributes well, Antigonus was able to take control of the Asian part of Alexander’s empire. His success encouraged the European and Egyptian parts of the empire to combine against him.

He waged a war against a coalition of the other Successors for some fourteen years, before being defeated in 301 BC at the Battle of Ipsus, where he was killed. Antigonus has caused controversy in his historical review and that may go some way to explain why he has received less recognition than was his due. Most contemporary reviews used him as an example of hubris and ambition, but that was common to leaders of the period who needed a strong flame within them to achieve success. However, he not only achieved a significant hold over a large part of Alexander’s empire, but achieved it from a less than promising starting point. Then in death, his descendants were not disinherited, dispersed or killed, but continued to rule and created a dynasty that would rule Macedonia for more than a century.

There is little illustration, but what is included in the form of maps adds strongly to the story and the text provides a graphic description that will be enjoyed by enthusiasts and novices alike. A recommended book.

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