Air War Archive, Heinkel He 111, The Latter Years – The Blitz and War in the East to the Fall of Germany

The Air War Archive series is proving a very popular frontline books collection and this new addition brings the Heinkel He 111 story up to the end of WWII. The He 111 was an example of an aircraft that was in heavy use from the Spanish Civil War to the capitulation of Germany in 1945 – Most Recommended.


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NAME: Air War Archive, Heinkel He 111, The Latter Years – The Blitz 
and War in the East to the Fall of Germany
FILE: R2695
AUTHOR: Chris Goss
PUBLISHER: frontline, Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  158
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 
Heinkel, medium bomber, twin engine bomber, torpedo bomber, 
tactical bomber, five engine tug, glider tug, transport, Heinkel 
111Z, blitz, strategic bombing

ISBN: 978-1-84832-445-9

IMAGE: B2695.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yba23gbu
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The Air War Archive series is proving a very popular 
frontline books collection and this new addition brings the Heinkel 
He 111 story up to the end of WWII. The He 111 was an example of an 
aircraft that was in heavy use from the Spanish Civil War to the 
capitulation of Germany in 1945  – Most Recommended.

For all the reputation of Germany as home of the 'master race' and 
unique master planning nation, WWII exposed all of the weaknesses 
behind the myths and showed that Germany was incapable of planning 
the war that it caused. Hitler and the Nazis presided over chaos 
and let ideology trump military and industrial planning. The opening 
stages of WWII seemed to support the myths as German arms triumphed, 
but the reality was that Germany lost the war from the invasion of 
Poland.

The He 111 is one of the many examples of weakness in aircraft 
design and manufacture for the needs of a major war against 
industrial nations.

When the He 111 appeared over Spain, it was able to depend on air 
superiority won by German fighter aircraft. It was successful in 
support of troops and as a strategic weapon, bombing largely 
civilian targets. It enjoyed a similar success in Poland where it 
again benefited greatly from the rapid destruction of the Polish 
Air Force, mainly on the ground. When the Germans rolled into the 
Low Countries, Denmark and Norway they did not face modern fighter 
aircraft and command and control systems. In France, the story was 
somewhat different. There was still a lack of radar supported 
command and control, but French fighters presented more serious 
opposition and the handful of RAF Hurricanes acquitted themselves 
very well, rapidly shooting down numbers of German bombers, 
including the He 111. When the Heinkel bomber appeared over London, 
it felt the full force of a well-trained and commanded force as the 
RAF combined modern fighters, at least equal to German machines, 
with the most advanced and fully integrated command and control 
system. From there on, German He 111 squadrons continued to fight 
with determination, but were fighting a losing battle because the 
design had not been updated or replaced by better equipment. 

The He 111 suffered the deficiencies of other German bombers in that 
their design assumed air superiority and a primary role of 
supporting fast advancing ground troops and armour, with strategic 
bombing seen as a secondary requirement.

The result was that the He 111 carried a relatively small bomb load 
in a cellular bomb bay, had a modest speed, a relatively short range 
and a defensive armament that was totally inadequate against modern 
fighters of the type equipping the RAF. A fast  eight gun fighter 
was usually only in the sights of a single rifle calibre machine gun 
and there were several blind spots where no machine gun could cover 
the attacking fighter. 

The RAF was equipped mainly with similarly inadequate medium bombers 
in 1939, but the RAF were able to look forward to significantly more 
effective four engine heavy bombers replacing most medium bombers in 
the strategic bombing roll, having very much heavier defensive 
armament in power-operated turrets, long range, and a very much 
heavier bomb load. However, the RAF had always been tasked primarily 
with strategic bombing, pioneered by the Royal Naval Air Service 
during WWI before the formation of the RAF. Even the newer medium 
bombers from 1939 were longer ranged and much more heavily armed, 
with the ability to carry greater bomb loads over the longer 
distances.

This book tells the story of the He 111's latter years with 
excellent photographs and captions. It covers the bombers but it 
also covers the additional roles introduced during the war because 
newer designs were not being introduced. The Heinkel as also used 
as a freight aircraft and as a glider tug, with the He 111Z 
comprising two He IIIs joined by a common central wing and with a 
fifth engine. This will be a popular book.