A Visitor’s Guide to: Jane Austen’s England

B2135

A delightful book where the author leads the reader through a long lost world that has been immortalized in the writings of Jane Austen. This is a most comprehensive review of the English society in the late 18th and early 19th Century, where the agricultural society was giving way to industry and urban society. There is detail and anecdotes, with a photo plate section in illustration.

The author has captured the amazing environment and drawn the reader into that environment. The reader could ask no more.

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NAME: A Visitor’s Guide to: Jane Austen’s England
DATE: 070215
FILE: R2135
AUTHOR: Sue Wilkes
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 184
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: 18th Century, 17775, 1820, George IV, middle classes, upper classes, society, diaries, letters, corsets, courtship, Regency, Prince of Wales, country ball
ISBN: 1-78159-264-1
IMAGE: B2135.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kfnyyz8
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: A delightful book where the author leads the reader through a long lost world that has been immortalized in the writings of Jane Austen. This is a most comprehensive review of the English society in the late 18th and early 19th Century, where the agricultural society was giving way to industry and urban society. There is detail and anecdotes, with a photo plate section in illustration.

Jane Austen maintains the following for her novels and these are regularly turned into television drama. Although the world in which she lived and of which she wrote has faded into history, her writing retains a vibrancy that does not dim with time – a major achievement for any writer.

Historically, this was a most important time for England. The American colonies were lost, although Canadians remained loyal and left their mark on the White House when they visited Washington. The Caribbean continued to produce wealth through the sugar crops and the war with France reached its climax with the defeat of the fleets of Spain and France, to be followed by the defeat on the field of battle of Napoleon, clearing the way for the British dash for Empire.

The tumultuous political and military scene was more than matched by the changes at home. George III, for all his health problems had been a much loved King. The Prince Regent was a less well-received figure who was to make a reasonably solid King, but the changes and intrigues at Court were nothing compared to the social revolution that was being wrought by the Industrial Revolution. The upper classes may still have had their wealth founded in the ownership of land and the pursuit of agriculture, making the country house parties and the country balls a major social activity, but newly elevated middle classes and artisans were acquiring great and sudden wealth from industry and the expansion of urban society. Within that, there were the Spa Towns that had catered for the wealthy from Roman times. Travel was enjoyed by an expanding social class, but had yet to enjoy the explosion of travel that was to come with the railways that opened up the British Isles to even the poorer people.

The author has captured the amazing environment and drawn the reader into that environment. The reader could ask no more

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