A Privileged Journey, from Enthusiast to Professional Railwayman

B2298

The author has re-embarked on his privileged journey as a youthful enthusiast into a career in the railways. There is a second volume promised to take the story on from the 1960s to today. Together, the two volumes will make a unique account of railway life and technology. This first volume is a fascinating insight into what is now something of a lost world, but still a world of dreams and love of steam. Strongly recommended.

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NAME: A Privileged Journey, from Enthusiast to Professional Railwayman
FILE: R2298
AUTHOR: David Maidment
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 214
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: railways, steam trains, locomotives,1950s, 1960s,railwayman, Railway Operating Manager, British Rail, Head of Safety, UK National Railway Museum, train ‘logs’, Steam World
ISBN: 978-1-78383-108-1-468-1
IMAGE: B2298.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/jacdlo8
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author has re-embarked on his privileged journey as a youthful enthusiast into a career in the railways. There is a second volume promised to take the story on from the 1960s to today. Together, the two volumes will make a unique account of railway life and technology. This first volume is a fascinating insight into what is now something of a lost world, but still a world of dreams and love of steam. Strongly recommended.

The story begins with the author’s experiences as a young enthusiast at a time when many boys became avid train spotters, travelling as widely as they could and recording the numbers of the many types of train in service. During this period, the boy and student took many photographs which are the basis of the selection reproduced in the book. There are so many fine images and so much detail that this is a book that will absorb enthusiast and novice alike.

When the author was growing up, there were diesel and electric trains already operating on British railways, but the backbone of the network continued to be steam. As steam engines were phased out the popularity of railways diminished for many young people and those who are keen enthusiasts tend to follow the reconstructed lines and restored steam trains of the growing number of trusts and museums. Now that steam engines are again hauling passengers on main lines, albeit rare journeys specifically for enthusiasts, perhaps some of the enthusiasm that was common in the author’s youth will return. It is difficult to explain exactly why the steam train held imagination so much more strongly than diesel and electric have been able to. In part it is now due to the fact that steam is preserved rather than being common currency. In part it is the sound and smell of steam and the vision of a powerful force rushing through the countryside, but there are so many other factors.

The author has provided detail without becoming trivial or boring. There is clearly the passion of a lifetime involved in rail and trains. There is the authenticity of someone who has worked up through a community that no longer exists. Above all this in an entertaining, information and engrossing story.

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