A Guide To Hitler’s Munich

This is a thought provoking book that sets Munich in perspective with Hitler and the NSDAP. The author describes how Munich became a focal point in the growth of the NSDAP under Adolf Hitler. – Highly Recommended.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://bbn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftnews.firetrench.com

http://broadlyboatnews.com

NAME: A Guide To Hitler's Munich
FILE: R3061
AUTHOR: David Mathieson
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Munich, Bavaria, Austria, Medieval streets, Hitler, Nazis, NSDAP, 1920s, 
1930s, anti-Semitism, Third Reich, Beer Hall Putsch, pre-WWI

ISBN: 1-52672-733-1

PAGES: 193
IMAGE: B3061.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yz6dctzd
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: This is a thought provoking book that sets Munich in perspective 
with Hitler and the NSDAP. The author describes how Munich became a focal 
point in the growth of the NSDAP under Adolf Hitler. – Highly Recommended.

The subject of Hitler and the NSDAP has attracted so much attention over the years. 
Hundreds, maybe thousands, of miles of film, acres of books, magazine stories and 
lectures have been devoted to one of the most atrocious periods of human history. 
There may be many reasons for this but there is so much yet to be uncovered, 
discussed, dissected, raked through. Munich is a cipher of Germany between the 
World Wars. Commendable history and culture, beautiful architecture, wonderful 
scenic backdrops, hospitable people, and yet the dark stain of Nazism is just the most 
recent part of a dark streak through the history of Munich.

Hitler was born in Western Austria, in what had once been the Archbisopric of 
Salzburg, brought up and schooled there, before moving to Munich. Once there he 
was a largely friendless individual scraping a living as an obscure artist. Had it not 
been for WWI and his enlistment in the Bavarian army he would probably have been 
an obscure artist, known to only a handful of people. He would probably have been 
filled with resentment, but this would have hurt very few. The war, and his struggle 
to remain in a peacetime Bavarian Army, resulted in him being trained as a 
propagandist and informer, uncovering his talent for oratory.

Munich society was not unlike Western Austrian society. From the early Medieval 
period it had a strong anti-Jewish streak and an equally anti-Muslim streak. The most 
unflattering statues reflect this hate. Stories of foul deeds attributed to these two 
groups were widely accepted at all levels of society from the poorest to the richest. 
Hitler absorbed this background and his resentment with the world took this hatred to 
a terrible level, of genocide on an industrial scale.

The author has provided a very readable guide to Munich and its relationship with 
Hitler. There is a very good black and white photo-plate section to add to the 
descriptive text.