: McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom, 1958 onwards ( all marks ), Owners’ Workshop Manual

B1689

This Haynes Owners' Workshop Manual has been written by a former RAF Phanton phlier and is lavishly illustrated. The photographs and drawings are outstanding for an outstanding aircraft. The manual concludes with a review of the restoration of F4H-1 Phantom II 'Sageburner' which was rescued from a scrap yard.

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NAME: McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom, 1958 onwards ( all marks ), Owners' Workshop Manual
CLASSIFICATION: Book reviews
FILE: R1689
Date: 071211
AUTHOR: Ian Black
PUBLISHER: Haynes Publishing
BINDING: Hard back
PAGES: 160
PRICE: £21.99
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT: Phanton II, twin jet fighters, fighter reconnaissance, Cold war, mach 2, twin seat fighter, naval aviation, ground attack, Vietnam War, Gulf War
ISBN: 978-1-84425-996-0
IMAGE: B1689
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/dysh7ug
LINKS: http://tinyurl.com/
DESCRIPTION: The Phantom II was as well known internationally as the Phantom I was long forgotten. The two aircraft shared only that they were intended for carrier operations with the USN and USMC. The Phantom I was a first generation US carrier jet and part of the learning curve, having a generally uninspiring performance at a time when new developments were pouring out of US and UK naval aviation design shops. The Phantom II was technically a very different animal and its outstanding attributes made it one of the most important aircraft of the Cold War. It served with the USN, USMC, USAF, British FAA, RAF and a host of other air forces, being a very important aircraft for Israel. Initially launched as a single seat fighter able to achieve Mach 2, the Phantom is best known as a two seat fast jet that has served with great success in a range of roles including air superiority, ground attack, reconnaissance, radar suppression. It has been built in Japan under license by Mitsubishi and for the Royal Navy and RAF with Rolls Royce engines. The British Phantoms suffered from the decision to fit Rolls Royce engines because the revised contours required to provide space for the larger engines increased drag. The British machines for RN FAA operations also required a long nose wheel leg to increase angle of attack for catapult launching from the smaller British carriers. When the British Labour Government of Wilson prematurely scrapped the last fixed wing carrier HMS Ark Royal IV, her Phantoms were reassigned to the RAF and the RAF requirements also led to a purchase of F-4J(UK) machines from the US. This Haynes Owners' Workshop Manual has been written by a former RAF Phanton phlier and is lavishly illustrated. The photographs and drawings are outstanding for an outstanding aircraft. The manual concludes with a review of the restoration of F4H-1 Phantom II 'Sageburner' which was rescued from a scrap yard. With so many Phantoms still serving around the world, or recently withdrawn from service, and with extensive stocks of spares, the Phantom II may become a regular vintage war bird as air displays. It is a large and complex jet that makes a daunting restoration project and will require relatively large sums to maintain in airworthy condition, but the vintage war bird preservation community has advanced so far over the last fifty years that it becomes practical to return even more daunting Cold War machines such as the British Vulcan V-Bomber and the unique Lightning fighter to flying condition. This manual provides a wealth of information and will prove very popular. Released in December 2011, it will make an ideal Christmas present for all ages. Highly recommended.

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