Images of War, United States Airborne Divisions 1942-2018, Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

A worthy addition to a very popular military history series. This book covers the history of US Airborne Divisions up to and including 2018 with the usual concise introductory text, captions and extended captions supporting a great selection of rare images – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: Images of War, United States Airborne Divisions 1942-2018, Rare 
Photographs From Wartime Archives
FILE: R2947
AUTHOR: Michael Green
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 475
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, World War 2, World War II, WWII, Second World War, 
military aviation, transport aircraft, C-47, Dakota, D-Day, Operation Overlord, 
vertical insertion, paratroopers, freight, supplies drops, C-130, rotary wing, armour, 
artillery C-119, C123, C124, Afghan invasion, Iraq invasion, Gulf War, Desert Storm, 
Desert Shield, Korean War, Vietnam War

ISBN: 1-52673-467-2

IMAGE: B2947.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4fac277
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: A worthy addition to a very popular military history series. This 
book covers the history of US Airborne Divisions up to and including 2018 with 
the usual concise introductory text, captions and extended captions supporting a 
great selection of rare images –   Very Highly Recommended

Over some 75 years of US Airborne Forces history there has rarely been any period 
without combat. Over the period, airborne forces have continued to evolve and are 
now regarded as Special Forces that may be used for anything from covert insertion 
of small groups, to large scale deployment alongside general land forces.

Initially, the US Airborne Divisions received much help from the British who had 
built considerable experience of using 'private armies' and airborne troops before 
1942. At the time, the British had learned from the Germans airborne operations in 
1940 and further developed techniques and tactics. The only methods of deployment 
then were as paratroopers from transport aircraft, or adapted bombers, or by assault 
glider. That made each operation a one-way exercise where the airborne troops were 
take to the battlefield with limited support equipment to operate as light infantry, 
taking and holding an objective until relieved by regular land forces. That method of 
insertion continues to this day, but the helicopter and tilt-rotor fixed wing aircraft 
have revolutionized airborne operations. As the British pioneered in Malaya, with 
US manufactured helicopters, VTOL aircraft greatly increase the mobility and 
versatility of airborne troops. Whether delivered by parachute or helicopter, the 
airborne troops are no longer captive to the area around the Drop Zone because a 
fleet of helicopters can move them around the battlefield and extract them as required 
without the intervention of land forces.

From the early helicopters with their payload restricted to less than 8 soldiers, 
medium and heavy lift helicopters have carried increasing numbers of troops and 
light reconnaissance vehicles into and out of battle with the prospect of tilt-rotor and 
compound helicopters achieving even great effectiveness. With the heavy lift 
helicopter came the ability to carry large under-slung loads of ammunition, fuel, 
food, and artillery and to recover wounded in numbers. It has also blurred the 
distinction of airborne forces because, although parachutes and jump training 
continues, and it used operationally in battle, the helicopter is a more frequent 
delivery and transport system. That means that ordinary ground troops are now 
routinely carried by helicopter and airborne troops routinely use heavy equipment 
including artillery, rockets and armour. The result is that airborne forces are now 
an elite Special Forces operator that has a capability far beyond what was typical 
in 1942. This has been an evolutionary process.

The author has beautifully illustrated the changes from 1942 to 2018. The 
illustrations, as usual for this series, are first rate, many rare, and some not 
previously published. Weapons and equipment through the period are well-illustrated, 
together with the evolution yet to come. In particular, drone aircraft and air-
transportable armour and vehicles is moving airborne operations out into a form 
of all-arms organization rather than being restricted to light infantry. Today an 
airborne force can call in heavy air support in the form of manned fast jets, but 
remote piloted and interactive autonomous aircraft are starting to come into service. 
Below that, there an increasing array of small controlled drones for reconnaissance 
and ordinance delivery, where the reconnaissance drones will become ever smaller, 
the smallest currently being like palm sized birds.