Over The Wire, A POW’s Escape Story From The Second World War

B1910

This book covers the experience of POW camps, the challenges of planning an escape, and then one of the finest accounts to have been written of life on the run through Occupied Europe. The author does provide an honest account of the highs and lows, but this is a thriller and will be enjoyed not only by those with and interest in WWII, but by anyone who reads adventure and suspense stories and histories. This edition of a gripping account of WWII has been published almost ten years after the death of the author.

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Fields of Death, Retracing Ancient Battlefields

B1908

The author has done an excellent job of examining a number of representative conflicts from the ancient world, blending together material from many different sources and disciplines. There will inevitably by some who contend with his conclusions and even with his methods, but he has made the basis of his journey visible and every reader can decide what to accept, what to question and what to reject. The probability is that most will find the presentation of information and the establishment of understanding compelling.

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Churchill’s Underground Army, A History of the Auxiliary Units in World War II

B1907

Very little has been written of British preparations to face a German invasion of the British Isles. From the Dunkirk evacuation, Churchill expected a German invasion attempt. The British and French troops rescued from the beaches of Dunkirk had left most of their equipment, even rifles and pistols, behind on the beaches. A significant portion of the artillery and armour available in Britain in 1939 had been sent to France, together with squadrons of Hurricane fighters and Fairy Battle light bombers. As the exhausted troops arrived back from France, there would have been very little to resist a German invasion. However, the Germans were also exhausted, had yet to collect an adequate number of invasion barges, landing craft and warships to form an invasion force, and Germany did not hold sea and air supremacy over the British beaches. As was demonstrated in 1944, large amphibious landings were costly and not guaranteed success, even with the huge Anglo American resources available for the Normandy landings, and the massive air and sea supremacy across the beaches and landing zones.

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